Freenote1

Let's Study In online

What you want??

9/08/2018

Aristotle’s concept of poetic truth


Aristotle’s concept of poetic truth    Poetic truth is the universal element in human nature and in human life expressed by the poet in his poetry. According to Aristotle, the function of a poet is to relate what may happen possibly according to the law of probability and necessity. By probability and necessity , he means the principle of nature causation. The events described should be such as are possible in real life. A poet has to present events in such a way that there appears a logical connection between them. There should be a sense of inevitability about the incidents presented. Each incident or event should lead logically to the next. The incidents together then, form coherent whole . This logical connection of the incidents gives to it a universal truth. As poetry is an imitation of the poet's idea of life  , poetry becomes ideal, and thus universal.    Poetry deals with idealized representation of reality, i.e. with what may happen or what is possible within the laws of probability and necessity. Thus poetry is different from history, for the latter merely relates what has already happened. The historian confines himself to particular happenings and hence he deals with ultimate Truth, while the historian deals with ephemeral particular facts. Poet can invest universality to particular facts. It is thus that the Trojan War has been given universal and permanent value and meaning through poetry by Homer in his “Iliod”. Thus poetry is more philosophical than history and embodies the “highest reality”.    Poetry imitates man in action . It has to follow the rules of probability and necessity. In order words, the incidents Should seem believable : they should also be so connected that their order seems inevitable. Further, the character should be true to their natures and act in a credible manner. The truth depicted by poetry is an ideal truth – i.e. if the represented situation became real , the represented sequences of incidents would also become inevitable. It is the poet's law of probability that makes even the impossible seem probable. Indeed, Aristotle prefers the probable impossibility to the improbable possibility. It is the poet’s ability to apply the rule of probability that creates willing suspension of disbelief in the audience or reader. It is a shrewd judgement by Aristotle.    Aristotle thus defends poetic truth and places it on a higher level than history, which merely presents factual truth . The poet relates what may happen, within the laws of probability. He universalises parties facts and invests permanence on transient happenings.

Poetic truth is the universal element in human nature and in human life expressed by the poet in his poetry. According to Aristotle, the function of a poet is to relate what may happen possibly according to the law of probability and necessity. By probability and necessity , he means the principle of nature causation. The events described should be such as are possible in real life. A poet has to present events in such a way that there appears a logical connection between them. There should be a sense of inevitability about the incidents presented. Each incident or event should lead logically to the next. The incidents together then, form coherent whole . This logical connection of the incidents gives to it a universal truth. As poetry is an imitation of the poet's idea of life  , poetry becomes ideal, and thus universal.

Poetry deals with idealized representation of reality, i.e. with what may happen or what is possible within the laws of probability and necessity. Thus poetry is different from history, for the latter merely relates what has already happened. The historian confines himself to particular happenings and hence he deals with ultimate Truth, while the historian deals with ephemeral particular facts. Poet can invest universality to particular facts. It is thus that the Trojan War has been given universal and permanent value and meaning through poetry by Homer in his “Iliod”. Thus poetry is more philosophical than history and embodies the “highest reality”.

Poetry imitates man in action . It has to follow the rules of probability and necessity. In order words, the incidents Should seem believable : they should also be so connected that their order seems inevitable. Further, the character should be true to their natures and act in a credible manner. The truth depicted by poetry is an ideal truth – i.e. if the represented situation became real , the represented sequences of incidents would also become inevitable. It is the poet's law of probability that makes even the impossible seem probable. Indeed, Aristotle prefers the probable impossibility to the improbable possibility. It is the poet’s ability to apply the rule of probability that creates willing suspension of disbelief in the audience or reader. It is a shrewd judgement by Aristotle.

Aristotle thus defends poetic truth and places it on a higher level than history, which merely presents factual truth . The poet relates what may happen, within the laws of probability. He universalises parties facts and invests permanence on transient happenings.

No comments:

Post a Comment

Related Posts

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...